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Rantings of a Sandmonkey

Be forewarned: The writer of this blog is an extremely cynical, snarky, pro-US, secular, libertarian, disgruntled sandmonkey. If this is your cup of tea, please enjoy your stay here. If not, please sod off

Sunday, August 28, 2005

A disturbing hoax

This is very wrong!

3 Comments:

At 8/29/2005 02:28:00 AM, Blogger ritzy said...

Oh dear, you beat me to this one with several hours. I have to learn to read your blog before the news!

 
At 8/30/2005 03:38:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have read that the southern tip of the state of Illinois is known as 'Egypt.' There is a city there named 'Cairo.' That is pronounced "Kay-ro," where the 'Kay' rhymes with'play.'

Before the Civil War, that area was the goal and dream of many slaves trying to escape slavery because it was the southernmost area of the free states and because it lay along both of the most important rivers in the region, the Mississippi and the Ohio rivers. There was an irony in this. The slaves, and many of their descendants since, knew of history mainly through the Bible, and most of the historical matter in the Bible is in the Old Testament. So, they were familiar with the stories of the Israelites over millennia and tended to identify with them. Likewise, they tended to identify their enemies--principally, the institution of slavery--with the enemies of the Israelites. One of the most important enemies was the Pharaoh of Egypt who confronted Moses. So, those latter-day Israelites were seeking refuge in "Egypt," instead of fleeing from it.

 
At 8/30/2005 03:38:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have read that the southern tip of the state of Illinois is known as 'Egypt.' There is a city there named 'Cairo.' That is pronounced "Kay-ro," where the 'Kay' rhymes with'play.'

Before the Civil War, that area was the goal and dream of many slaves trying to escape slavery because it was the southernmost area of the free states and because it lay along both of the most important rivers in the region, the Mississippi and the Ohio rivers. There was an irony in this. The slaves, and many of their descendants since, knew of history mainly through the Bible, and most of the historical matter in the Bible is in the Old Testament. So, they were familiar with the stories of the Israelites over millennia and tended to identify with them. Likewise, they tended to identify their enemies--principally, the institution of slavery--with the enemies of the Israelites. One of the most important enemies was the Pharaoh of Egypt who confronted Moses. So, those latter-day Israelites were seeking refuge in "Egypt," instead of fleeing from it.

 

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